Interior design trends 2022

Why interior design?

Interior design is the art and science of enhancing the interior of a building to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing environment. “There is more and more research that shows the direct influence that our homes have on our overall health and well-being.” Interior designer Timothy Corrigan of Timothy Corrigan Inc.

Every year, professional designers and home editors get a kick out of predicting the different design trends people will welcome into their homes. Last year we were inspired by trends such as curvy furniture, biodesign and colours like sky- and cobalt blue. So, what are the interior trends defining 2022? Everything from bringing the outdoors in to experimenting with pattern and texture and finding design inspirations from past decades are of interest.

A group of dynamic interior designers have come together in several articles to find out the top interior design trends that they’ve come across so far this year. We’ve put together the best tips from this Vogue article and this goodhousekeeping article to help guide you through the interior design trends 2022.


Shades of Brown:

“Neutrals will take a bit of a back seat in 2022 as people start to experiment with colour again, but the palette will stay very close to hues you’d find in nature. We predict paint rollers will be dipped in rosy, terracotta tones, swathing rooms from wall to ceiling for a complete monochromatic moment that envelops you in its cosiness.”Athena Calderone




Home Libraries:

“I’ve noticed that people have been investing in home libraries for their families. They are starting to grasp that not everything has to be on a laptop, smartphone or tablet.”Linda Hayslett, LH.Designs




Nature-Inspired Surfaces and Objects:

“With more time spent indoors than ever before, we’re all seeking to strengthen our connection with nature. This has simultaneously inspired a resurgence in natural surfaces – think stoneware, terracotta, marble, and travertine being used across the board from backsplashes to bathtubs, furniture, and decorative objects. The raw, porous, imperfect nature of these organic materials adds depth, soul, and visual intrigue while also mimicking the calming, restorative ambiance of the outdoors. This lure back to nature has also sparked an interest in large trees at home, from the elegant black olive to Southern magnolias.” – Athena Calderone



Texture:

“Textures are going to be utilized far outside of furniture and rugs this year. Tongue and groove boards on the ceiling add to architectural interest while injecting an earthy texture. Curtains can be used to filter light beautifully and add a softness to the room. Even lighting can provide texture to rooms, depending on the material used.” – Joshua Smith, Joshua Smith Inc.




Up-and-Coming Artwork:

“Art collections focused on up and coming artists and artists of colour. Gone are the days of high-brow art collecting dominating the scene. My clients are looking for fresh faces on the art scene. They also want collections that reflect the diversity of our world and the perspectives these artists offer.” – Daniele Colding



Bold Patterns and Colors:

“I expect to see a lot of bold colour and pattern reminiscent of the 60’s and 70’s, and green in all shades as we continue to bring the outdoors in. I am especially fond of the more muted shades of green such as Sherwin-Williams’ Evergreen Fog, as seen in my own bedroom.” Beth Diana Smith, Beth Diana Smith Interior Design




Vintage and Sustainable Accents:

“Whenever I can use vintage, I will. From a design standpoint, vintage is the protagonist of every room—it has the power to influence the storytelling and direction. Their patina brings a touchable texture and warmth to every space, not to mention a sacred sentimentality. But aside from their decorative propensity, these rare antiquities are stylishly sustainable. By repurposing the old, the damaged, the jagged into something new, we’re reducing our footprint while bringing a rich sense of history and spirit into a space.” – Athena Calderone




Sculptural and Curved Furniture:

“A curved form is subconsciously read as safe, friendly and welcoming. With everyone feeling a bit precious I think those softer shapes and angles will still be a big trend in 2022 in furniture as well as architecture.” – Sarah Sherman Samuel


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